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Genetics Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 852196, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/852196
Research Article

Association Study between Idiopathic Scoliosis and Polymorphic Variants of VDR, IGF-1, and AMPD1 Genes

1National Genetic Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University-Sofia, 2 Zdrave Street, 14th Floor, 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria
2Tokuda Hospital Sofia, Orthopedic and Traumatology Clinic, 51B Nikola Vaptsarov Boulevard, 1407 Sofia, Bulgaria
3University Orthopedic Hospital “Prof. Boycho Boychev”, Medical University-Sofia, 56 Nikola Petkov Boulevard, 1614 Sofia, Bulgaria
4Molecular Medicine Center, Medical University-Sofia, 2 Zdrave Street, 14th Floor, 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria

Received 13 July 2015; Accepted 18 August 2015

Academic Editor: Jerzy Kulski

Copyright © 2015 Svetla Nikolova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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