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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2009, Article ID 591704, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/591704
Research Article

Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 1B Haplotypes Increase or Decrease the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in a New Zealand Caucasian Population

1Discipline of Nutrition, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
2Nutrigenomics New Zealand, New Zealand
3Department of Gastroenterology, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand
4Department of Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch, New Zealand
5Crop and Food Research, Mosgiel 9053, New Zealand
6AgResearch Limited, Mosgiel 9053, New Zealand

Received 3 October 2008; Accepted 2 February 2009

Academic Editor: Robert Wyllie

Copyright © 2009 Lynnette R. Ferguson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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