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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 539461, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/539461
Research Article

IL23R and IL12B SNPs and Haplotypes Strongly Associate with Crohn's Disease Risk in a New Zealand Population

1Discipline of Nutrition, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand
2Nutrigenomics, New Zealand
3Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand

Received 13 July 2010; Accepted 2 November 2010

Academic Editor: Antoni Castells

Copyright © 2010 Lynnette R. Ferguson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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