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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 161358, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/161358
Review Article

The Potential Role of Probiotics in the Management of Childhood Autism Spectrum Disorders

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2R&D Department, Winclove Bio Industries, Hulstweg 11, 1032 LB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3Integrative Health Consulting, Milber, Newton Abbot, Devon TQ12 4SG, UK

Received 31 March 2011; Accepted 20 August 2011

Academic Editor: P. Enck

Copyright © 2011 J. William Critchfield et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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