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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 524383, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/524383
Review Article

Frequent Abdominal Pain in Childhood and Youth: A Systematic Review of Psychophysiological Characteristics

1Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Tübingen, Schleichstraße 4, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
2Department of Internal Medicine VI/Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Frondsbergstraße 23, 72070 Tübingen, Germany
3Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE), University of Luxembourg, Route de Diekirch-B.P. 2, L-7201 Walferdange, Luxembourg

Received 17 September 2013; Accepted 5 February 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Peter James Whorwell

Copyright © 2014 Marco Daniel Gulewitsch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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