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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2015, Article ID 438329, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/438329
Research Article

Cognitive Functions and Depression in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

1Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, 2380 Brumunddal, Norway
2Unit for Applied Clinical Research, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
3Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
4Hedmark University College, 2409 Elverum, Norway

Received 27 January 2015; Revised 9 April 2015; Accepted 15 April 2015

Academic Editor: Leticia Moreira

Copyright © 2015 Per G. Farup and Knut Hestad. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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