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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2016, Article ID 4514687, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4514687
Research Article

Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

1Department of Internal Medicine, Novosel Aviation Clinic, Fort Riley, KS, USA
2Department of Gastroenterology, St. Luke's Clinic, Twin Falls, ID, USA
3Department of Internal Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX, USA
4Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Larkin Community Hospital, South Miami, FL, USA
5Novosel Aviation Clinic, Fort Riley, KS, USA

Received 7 March 2016; Revised 16 July 2016; Accepted 10 August 2016

Academic Editor: Helieh Oz

Copyright © 2016 Martin Oman Evans II et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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