Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology / 1993 / Article

Clinical study | Open Access

Volume 1 |Article ID 121457 | https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744993000274

Mark G. Martens, "Evaluation of Infectious Disease Knowledge in Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Effects of Varying Durations of Training", Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 1, Article ID 121457, 5 pages, 1993. https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744993000274

Evaluation of Infectious Disease Knowledge in Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Effects of Varying Durations of Training

Received31 Mar 1993
Accepted01 Sep 1993

Abstract

Objective: The amount, origin, and resources of infectious disease knowledge in the field ofobstetrics and gynecology were investigated. If this knowledge is lacking, the exact length of the specific infectious disease training during residency should be defined to meet the ever-increasing knowledge required in training.Methods: A 50-question test was developed by one faculty member utilizing questions that incorporated the basic sciences of microbiology and pharmacology and clinical knowledge of infectious diseases in the area of obstetrics and gynecology. Multiple choice and matching questions were structured so as to ascertain the source of the knowledge, including medical school curriculum, recent journal articles, and clinical experience.Results: The test was given yearly to all students and residents on the Obstetric and Gynecology Service over a period of 2 year's. The questions were the same for each group, but were reshuffled each exam period. Three hundred and seven tests were properly administered and recorded. There was no statistical improvement in any successive year’s scores unless specific infectious disease training occurred. Increasing improvement in scores was noted, with an increasing duration of infectious disease training specific for obstetrics and gynecology, beginning at 2 weeks (22% improvement), 4 weeks (30% improvement), and 6 weeks (31% improvement) (P = .05–.001). Basic science questions were most frequently answered correctly by medical students and early residents, while correctly answered clinical questions correlated with increasing clinical experience except in the area of ambulatory care.Conclusions: The infectious disease knowledge of residents in obstetrics and gynecology can be improved with 4 weeks of intensive training. Re-exposure to basic science knowledge and improved training in ambulatory care in this resident group appear to be necessary. This test or similar tests can be helpful in defining areas of deficiencies and their possible remedies.

Copyright © 1993 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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