Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology / 1999 / Article

Open Access

Volume 7 |Article ID 845730 | https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744999000204

P. C. Giraldo, A. D. Ribeiro-Filho, J. A. Simões, A. Neuer, S. B. N. Feitosa, S. S. Witkin, "Circulating Heat Shock Proteins in Women With a History of Recurrent Vulvovaginitis", Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 7, Article ID 845730, 5 pages, 1999. https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744999000204

Circulating Heat Shock Proteins in Women With a History of Recurrent Vulvovaginitis

Received09 Sep 1998
Accepted30 Dec 1998

Abstract

Objective: Predisposing factors influencing recurrences of bacterial vaginosis (BV) or vaginitis from Candida remain unidentified for most women. As a component of studies to determine host susceptibility factors to genital tractiiafeetions in women, we measured expression of the 60-kDa and 70-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp60 and hsp70, respectively) in the circulation of women with or without a history of recurrent BV or candidal vaginitis and with or without a current lower genital tract infection. Heat shock protein expression is associated with a down-regulation of proinflammatory immune responses that would inhibit microbial infection.Method: The investigators measured hsp60 and hsp70, antibodies to these proteins, the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin- 10 (IL-10) in sera by ELISA. The study population consisted of 100 women who attended a gynecology clinic in Campinas, Brazil. Of those, 55 had a history of recurrent vulvovaginitis (RV), while 45 were controls with no such history. Only women who were asymptomatic for at least 1 month were studied.Results: Although all were asymptomatic, clinical and microbiological examination revealed that five of the women with a history of RV and two controls had a current candidal vaginal infection; 16 RV patients and 12 controls had BV; and six RV patients had both BV and candidiasis. Twenty-eight RV patients and 31 controls had no clinical or microbiological detectable vaginal infection. Among the RV patients, hsp60 and hsp70 were more prevalent in those with current BV (40.9% and 50.0%, respectively) or a candidal infection (45.5% and 54.5%) than in women with no current infection (21.4% and 17.9%). In the women with no history of RV, BV was not associated with a high prevalence of hsp60 (8.3%) or hsp70 (8.3%). Interleukin-10 and TNF were not more prevalent in vaginitis patients or controls with a current candidal infection or BV than in uninfected subjects.Conclusion: The high prevalence of circulating hsp60 and hsp70 in women with a history of RV and current BV or vaginal candidiasis, but not in women with no history of RV, suggests that differences in heat shock protein induction may be related to susceptibility to recurrent vaginal infections. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 7:128–132, 1999.

Copyright © 1999 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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