Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology / 2001 / Article

Open Access

Volume 9 |Article ID 786974 | https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744901000035

Jack Sobel, Jeffrey F. Peipert, James A. McGregor, Charles Livengood, Maureen Martin, Jill Robbins, Charles P. Wajszczuk, "Efficacy of Clindamycin Vaginal Ovule (3-Day Treatment) vs. Clindamycin Vaginal Cream (7-Day Treatment) in Bacterial Vaginosis", Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 9, Article ID 786974, 7 pages, 2001. https://doi.org/10.1155/S1064744901000035

Efficacy of Clindamycin Vaginal Ovule (3-Day Treatment) vs. Clindamycin Vaginal Cream (7-Day Treatment) in Bacterial Vaginosis

Received01 Dec 1999
Accepted30 Nov 2000

Abstract

Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of a 3-day regimen of clindamycin vaginal ovules with a 7-day regimen of clindamycin vaginal cream for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV)Methods: Women with a clinical diagnosis of BV were treated with a 3-day course of clindamycin ovules or a 7-day course of clindamycin cream administered intravaginally. Three hundred and eighty-four patients received study drug and were included in the evaluable patient population (ovule group, n = 204; cream group, n = 180). Assessments included pelvic examination and diagnostic testing. Primary efficacy endpoints were a resolution of two of three diagnostic criteria at the first follow-up visit and three of three diagnostic criteria at the second.Results: Cure rates in the evaluable patient population were similar between treatment groups: 53.7% (109/204) for the ovule group and 47.8% (85/180) for the cream group (p = 0.2471, 95% CI– 4.1–16.0%). The most commonly reported medical event, vulvovaginal pruritus, had similar incidence in both treatment groups.Conclusions: A 3-day course of clindamycin vaginal ovules is as effective and well-tolerated as a 7-day course of clindamycin vaginal cream in the treatment of BV.

Copyright © 2001 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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