Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 56504, 3 pages
Clinical Study

Assessment of the Value of Rescreening for Syphilis in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville 32610-0294, FL, USA

Received 12 January 2006; Revised 6 March 2006; Accepted 28 March 2006

Copyright © 2006 Rodney K. Edwards et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2002,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 51, no. RR-6, pp. 1–80, 2002.
  2. L M Hollier, J Hill, J S Sheffield, and G D Jr Wendel, “State laws regarding prenatal syphilis screening in the United States,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 189, no. 4, pp. 1178–1183, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. B Stray-Pedersen, “Is screening for genital infections in pregnancy necessary?,” Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, vol. 76, no. suppl 164, pp. 116–120, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  4. A M Ries, “Neisseria gonorrhoeae screening in pregnancy,” Military Medicine, vol. 165, no. 7, pp. 549–551, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  5. B J Stoll, W P Jr Kanto, R I Glass, and J Pushkin, “Treated maternal gonorrhea without adverse effect on outcome of pregnancy,” Southern Medical Journal, vol. 75, no. 10, pp. 1236–1238, 1982. View at Google Scholar
  6. M C Boudreaux, J M Jr Miller, J Wightkin, S Martin, and F Mather, “Collaborative care for obstetric patients at low and high Risk: an evolving model,” Journal of Perinatology, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 33–36, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  7. J M Jr Miller, R T Maupin, R E Mestad, and M Nsuami, “Initial and repeated screening for gonorrhea during pregnancy,” Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 30, no. 9, pp. 728–730, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. J T Christmas, G D Wendel, R E Bawdon, R Farris, G Cartwright, and B B Little, “Concomitant infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in pregnancy,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 74, no. 3 I, pp. 295–298, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  9. Centers for Disease Control Prevention. Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2003 supplement. Atlanta, Ga: Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; December 2004. syphilis surveillance report.
  10. U Magriples and J A Copel, “Can risk factor assessment replace universal screening for gonorrhea and Chlamydia in the third trimester?,” American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 465–468, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. S J Schrag, K E Arnold, J C Mohle-Boetani et al., “Prenatal screening for infectious diseases and opportunities for prevention,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 102, no. 4, pp. 753–760, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar