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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 82412, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/82412
Clinical Study

Species Distribution and Susceptibility to Azoles of Vaginal Yeasts Isolated Prostitutes

1Centro de Investigaciones en Enfermedades Tropicales (CIET), Facultad de Microbiologia, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José 2060, Costa Rica
2Departamento de Control de SIDA y Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual, Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social, San José 1000, Costa Rica
3Karolinska Institutet, Department of Laboratory Medicine F72, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 141 86, Sweden

Received 23 April 2007; Accepted 29 May 2007

Copyright © 2007 Norma T. Gross et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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