Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 675360, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/675360
Review Article

Nonhuman Primate Models Used to Study Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Caused by Chlamydia trachomatis

1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, L4510, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4Reproductive Sciences Program and the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
5Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 15 May 2011; Accepted 3 June 2011

Academic Editor: Thomas Cherpes

Copyright © 2011 Jason D. Bell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance, 2007, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Ga, USA, 2008.
  2. D. E. Soper, “Pelvic inflammatory disease,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 116, no. 2, pp. 419–428, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. World Health Organization Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections: 2006–2015, 2007.
  4. W. C. Hill, “The use of primates in biomedical studies: a review of suitable species,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 162, no. 1, pp. 7–14, 1969. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. Keith, “The extent to which the posterior segments of the body have been transmuted and suppressed in the evolution of man and allied primates,” Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, vol. 37, pp. 18–40, 1902. View at Google Scholar
  6. A. Keith, “The modes of origin of the carotid and subclavian arteries from the arch of the aorta in some of the higher primates,” Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, vol. 29, pp. 453–458, 1895. View at Google Scholar
  7. T. M. D'Hooghe, C. M. Kyama, D. Chai et al., “Nonhuman primate models for translational research in endometriosis,” Reproductive Sciences, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 152–161, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. D. Chai, S. Cuneo, H. Falconer, J. M. Mwenda, and T. D'Hooghe, “Olive baboon (Papio anubis anubis) as a model for intrauterine research,” Journal of Medical Primatology, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 365–369, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. W. F. MacKenzie and H. W. Casey, “Animal model of human disease: endometriosis in rhesus monkeys,” The American Journal of Pathology, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 341–344, 1975. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. R. W. Te Linde and R. B. Scott, “Experimental endometriosis,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 60, no. 5, pp. 1147–1173, 1950. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. Thygeson and W. F. Mengert, “The virus on inclusion conjunctivitis,” Archives of Ophthalmology, vol. 15, pp. 377–410, 1936. View at Google Scholar
  12. B. R. Moller and P. A. Mardh, “Experimental salpingitis in grivet monkeys by Chlamydia trachomatis. Modes of spread of infection to the fallopian tubes,” Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 107–114, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. A. Johnson and D. Taylor-Robinson, “Animal model of human disease: chlamydial genital tract infections, experimental infection of the primate genital tract with chlamydia trachomatis,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 106, pp. 132–135, 1982. View at Google Scholar
  14. D. L. Patton, C. C. Kuo, S. P. Wang, and S. A. Halbert, “Distal tubal obstruction induced by repeated Chlamydia trachomatis salpingeal infections in pig-tailed macaques,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 155, no. 6, pp. 1292–1299, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. N. F. Jacobs Jr., E. S. Arum, and S. J. Kraus, “Experimental infection of the chimpanzee urethra and pharynx with Chlamydia trachomatis,” Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 132–136, 1978. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. I. Miyairi, K. H. Ramsey, and D. L. Patton, “Duration of untreated Chlamydial genital infection and factors associated with clearance: review of animal studies,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 201, no. 2, pp. S96–S103, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. P. M. Furr and D. Taylor-Robinson, “Enhancement of experimental Mycoplasma pulmonis infection of the mouse genital tract by progesterone treatment,” Journal of Hygiene, vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 139–144, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. L. Barron, H. J. White, and R. G. Rank, “A new animal model for the study of Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections: infection of mice with the agent of mouse pneumonitis,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 143, no. 1, pp. 63–66, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. H. E. Carlsson, S. J. Schapiro, I. Farah, and J. Hau, “Use of primates in research: a global overview,” American Journal of Primatology, vol. 63, no. 4, pp. 225–237, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. A. P. Johnson, C. M. Hetherington, and M. F. Osborn, “Experimental infection of the marmoset genital tract with Chlamydia trachomatis,” British Journal of Experimental Pathology, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 291–295, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Bell, L. Harris, and I. Bergin, “The baboon (Papio anubis) as a novel model of Chlamydia trachomatis pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) for testing intrauterine contraception (IUC) oral presentation,” in Proceedings of the 37th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society for Obstetrics & Gynecology, Santa Fe, NM, USA, August 2010.
  22. D. L. Patton and R. G. Rank, “Animal models for the study of pelvic inflammatory disease,” in Advances in Host Defense Mechanisms: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, T. C. Quinn, Ed., vol. 8, pp. 85–111, Raven Press, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  23. E. Honore and S. Tardif, “Reproductive biology of Baboons,” in The Baboon in Biomedical Research, J. L. VandeBerg , S. Williams-Blangero, and S. Tardif, Eds., Springer, Chicago, III, USA, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  24. K. Cawthon Lang, Primate Fact Sheets: Vervet (Chlorocebus) Taxonomy, Morphology, and Ecology, 2011, http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/factsheets/entry/vervet.
  25. J. Kingdon and TM B, Chlorocebus aethiops, 2011, http://www.iucnredlist.org.
  26. J. Seier, “Vervet monkey breeding,” in The Laboratory Primate: Handbook of Experimental Animals, S. Wolfe-Coote, Ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  27. S. Rensing and A.-K. Oerke, “Husbandry and management of New World Species: marmosets and tamarins,” in The Laboratory Primate: Handbook of Experimental Animals, S. Wolfe-Coote, Ed., pp. 175–180, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  28. H. M. Kubisch, C. Gagliardi, V. M. Williams, E. P. Ribka, and M. S. Ratterree, “In vitro fertilization in the pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina),” Theriogenology, vol. 66, no. 4, pp. 749–754, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. E. Van Esch, J. M. Cline, E. Buse, C. E. Wood, E. P. C. T. de Rijk, and G. F. Weinbauer, “Summary comparison of female reproductive system in human and the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis),” Toxicologic Pathology, vol. 36, no. 7, supplement, pp. 171S–172S, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  30. G. Weinbauer, M. Niehoff et al., “Physiology and endocrinology of the ovarian cycle in macaques,” Toxicologic Pathology, vol. 36, no. 7, supplement, pp. 7S–23S, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  31. E. R. Alexander and W. T. Chiang, “Infection of pregnant monkeys and their offspring with TRIC agents,” American Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 63, no. 5, pp. 1145–1153, 1967. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. K. T. Ripa, B. R. Moller, and P. A. Mardh, “Experimental acute salpingitis in grivet monkeys provoked by Chlamydia trachomatis,” Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica, vol. 87, no. 1, pp. 65–70, 1979. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. B. R. Moller, E. A. Freundt, F. T. Black, and F. Melsen, “Experimental infection of the upper genital tract of female grivet monkeys with Mycoplasma fermentans,” Journal of Medical Microbiology, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 145–149, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. A. P. Johnson, M. F. Osborn, and B. J. Thomas, “Immunity to reinfection of the genital tract of marmosets with Chlamydia trachomatis,” British Journal of Experimental Pathology, vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 606–613, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. A. P. Johnson, M. J. Hare, G. D. Wilbanks et al., “A colposcopic and histological study of experimental chlamydial cervicitis in marmosets,” British Journal of Experimental Pathology, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 59–65, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. D. L. Patton, S. A. Halbert, and C. C. Kuo, “Host response to primary Chlamydia trachomatis infection of the fallopian tube in pig-tailed monkeys,” Fertility and Sterility, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 829–840, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. D. L. Patton, “Immunopathology and histopathology of experimental chlamydial salpingitis,” Reviews of Infectious Diseases, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 746–753, 1985. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. D. L. Patton, C. C. Kuo, and S. P. Wang, “Chlamydial infection of subcutaneous fimbrial transplants in cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 155, no. 2, pp. 229–235, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. D. L. Patton, P. Wolner-Hanssen, S. J. Cosgrove, and K. K. Holmes, “The effects of Chlamydia trachomatis on the female reproductive tract of the Macaca nemestrina after a single tubal challenge following repeated cervical inoculations,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 76, no. 4, pp. 643–650, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. P. Wolner-Hanssen, D. L. Patton, and K. K. Holmes, “Protective immunity in pig-tailed macaques after cervical infection with Chlamydia trachomatis,” Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 21–25, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. D. L. Patton, Y. T. C. Sweeney, and C. C. Kuo, “Demonstration of delayed hypersensitivity in Chlamydia trachomatis salpingitis in monkeys: a pathogenic mechanism of tubal damage,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 169, no. 3, pp. 680–683, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. W. C. Van Voorhis, L. K. Barrett, Y. T. C. Sweeney, C. C. Kuo, and D. L. Patton, “Repeated Chlamydia trachomatis infection of Macaca nemestrina fallopian tubes produces a Th1-like cytokine response associated with fibrosis and scarring,” Infection and Immunity, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 2175–2182, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. D. L. Patton, Y. T. Cosgrove Sweeney, and W. E. Stamm, “Significant reduction in inflammatory response in the macaque model of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease with azithromycin treatment,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 192, no. 1, pp. 129–135, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. D. L. Patton, Y. T. Cosgrove Sweeney, and K. J. Paul, “A summary of preclinical topical microbicide vaginal safety and chlamydial efficacy evaluations in a pigtailed macaque model,” Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 35, no. 10, pp. 889–897, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. D. L. Patton, Y. T. C. Sweeney, and K. J. Paul, “A summary of preclinical topical microbicide rectal safety and efficacy evaluations in a pigtailed macaque model,” Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 350–356, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. B. R. Moller, E. A. Freundt, and P. A. Mardh, “Experimental pelvic inflammatory disease provoked by Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis in grivet monkeys,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 138, no. 7, pp. 990–995, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. T. M. D'Hooghe , J. M. Mwenda, and J. A. Hill, “A critical review of the use and application of the baboon as a model for research in women's reproductive health,” Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation, vol. 57, pp. 1–60, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  48. P. J. Provost and J. H. Vickers, “Attempted immunization against trachoma infection in baboons,” American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 599–605, 1972. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. R. F. Digiacomo, J. L. Gale, S. P. Wang, and M. D. Kiviat, “Chlamydial infection of the male baboon urethra,” British Journal of Venereal Diseases, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 310–313, 1975. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus