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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 989762, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/989762
Research Article

The Role of Chlamydia trachomatis Polymorphic Membrane Proteins in Inflammation and Sequelae among Women with Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

1Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, 644 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
3Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA
4Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
5School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 2 June 2011; Revised 30 July 2011; Accepted 10 August 2011

Academic Editor: Thomas Cherpes

Copyright © 2011 Brandie D. Taylor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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