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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 378640, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/378640
Clinical Study

Prevalence and Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis and Other Vulvovaginitis in a Population of Sexually Active Adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health (EBMSP), 40290-000 Salvador, BA, Brazil
2Advanced Laboratory of Public Health (CPQGM), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil

Received 6 July 2012; Revised 6 September 2012; Accepted 20 September 2012

Academic Editor: Catherine L. Haggerty

Copyright © 2012 Rita Elizabeth Moreira Mascarenhas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and genital candidiasis are considered the main etiologies of vulvovaginitis. Few studies estimate the prevalence of vulvovaginitis among adolescents, especially in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and main risk factors associated with bacterial vaginosis and genital infection by C. albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis among a group of adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. One hundred sexually active adolescents followed at an adolescent gynecology clinic were included. Endocervical and vaginal samples were obtained during gynecological examination. Nugent criteria were applied for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. For Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis detection, culture in Sabouraud agar plates and Papanicolaou cytology were used, respectively. The mean age of participants was years. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was 20% (95% CI 12–28) and of genital infection by Candida was 22% (95% CI 14–30). Vaginal cytology detected Trichomonas vaginalis in one patient. Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use ( ) and multiple lifetime partners were statistically related to bacterial vaginosis ( ). The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and genital candidiasis was similar to other studies carried out among adolescents worldwide.