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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 503648, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/503648
Clinical Study

Vaginal Impact of the Oral Administration of Total Freeze-Dried Culture of LCR 35 in Healthy Women

1Institute Alfred Fournier, 25 Boulevard St Jacques, 75014 Paris, France
2Biopharmaceutical Department, University of Pharmacy, 28 pl H. Dunant, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand, France

Received 28 December 2011; Revised 18 March 2012; Accepted 10 April 2012

Academic Editor: Bryan Larsen

Copyright © 2012 J. M. Bohbot and J. M. Cardot. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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