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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3281975, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3281975
Research Article

Influenza Vaccination among Pregnant Women: Patient Beliefs and Medical Provider Practices

1Research Department, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024, USA
2Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, 1111 Augusta Drive, Houston, TX 77057, USA
3Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Albany Medical Center, 391 Myrtle Avenue, Suite 2, Albany, NY 12208, USA
4The University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2050, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
5Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Geisinger Health System, 100 N Academy Avenue, Danville, PA 17822, USA
6Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Albany Medical Center, 391 Myrtle Avenue, 2nd floor, MC 74, Albany, NY 12208, USA
7American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024, USA

Received 11 February 2016; Accepted 28 June 2016

Academic Editor: Bryan Larsen

Copyright © 2016 Lauren M. Stark et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

ACOG’s research department recruited four medical centers to participate in a study on the attitudes and practices of medical providers and pregnant patients regarding influenza vaccination. Medical providers and patients were given voluntary surveys and medical record data was collected over two flu seasons, from 2013 to 2015. Discrepancies between self-reports of medical providers and patients and medical records were observed. Nearly 80% of patients self-reported accepting the influenza vaccine, but medical record data only reported 36% of patients accepting the vaccine. Similarly, all medical providers reported giving recommendations for the vaccine, but only 85% of patients reported receiving a recommendation. Age, education, a medical provider’s recommendation, and educational materials were found to positively influence patient beliefs about the influenza vaccine. Accepting the vaccine was influenced by a patient’s previous actions, beliefs, and a medical provider’s recommendation. Patients who reported previously not accepting the vaccine and had negative feelings towards the vaccine but accepted it while pregnant reported concern for the health and safety of their baby. Future research should focus on groups that may be less likely to accept the vaccine and ways to dispel negative myths. Medical provider should continue to strongly recommend the vaccine and provide educational materials.