Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2017, Article ID 2105061, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2105061
Research Article

Women Living with HIV over Age of 65: Cervical Cancer Screening in a Unique and Growing Population

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Miami, FL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Alexandra Aserlind; ude.imaim.dem@dnilresa.a

Received 22 March 2017; Revised 11 May 2017; Accepted 30 July 2017; Published 17 September 2017

Academic Editor: Janet S. Rader

Copyright © 2017 Alexandra Aserlind et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diagnoses of HIV infection among adults aged 50 years and older in the United States and dependent areas, 2007–2010. CDC HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2013; 18 (3).
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “HIV Surveillance Report,” Tech. Rep., 2011, Published February 2013. Accessed [March 12, 2016] http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/. View at Google Scholar
  3. R. A. Legarth, M. G. Ahlström, G. Kronborg et al., “Long-term mortality in HIV-infected individuals 50 years or older: a nationwide, population-based cohort study,” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 213–218, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. A. Glaude-Hosch, M. L. Smith, T. G. Heckman, T. P. Miles, B. A. Olubajo, and M. G. Ory, “Sexual behaviors, healthcare interactions, and HIV-related perceptions among adults age 60 years and older: an investigation by race/ethnicity,” Current HIV Research, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 359–368, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2012. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013.
  6. “Gynecologic care for women with human inmmunodeficiency virus. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 117. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists,” Obstetrics & Gynecology, vol. 117, pp. 1492–1509, 2010.
  7. M.-C. Delmas, C. Larsen, B. Van Benthem et al., “Cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-infected women: prevalence, incidence and regression. European study group on natural history of HIV infection in women,” AIDS, vol. 14, no. 12, pp. 1775–1784, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. Z. M. Chirenje, “HIV and cancer of the cervix,” Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 269–276, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  9. “Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 168. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists,” Obstetrics & Gynecology, vol. 128, no. 1, pp. e111–e130, 2016.
  10. Final Recommendation Statement: Cervical Cancer: Screening. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. October 2014.
  11. S. L. Kulasingam, L. Havrilesky, R. Ghebre, and E. R. Myers, Screening for cervical cancer: a decision analysis for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AHRQ Publication No. 11-05157-EF-1. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; May 2011.
  12. N. Howlader, A. M. Noone, M. Krapcho et al., SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975–2012, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA, 2015.
  13. S. K. Kjær, K. Frederiksen, C. Munk, and T. Iftner, “Long-term absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse following human papillomavirus infection: role of persistence,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 102, no. 19, pp. 1478–1488, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus