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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2017, Article ID 1316808, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1316808
Research Article

Effect of Postsowing Compaction on Cold and Frost Tolerance of North China Plain Winter Wheat

1Beijing Research Center of Intelligent Equipment for Agriculture, Beijing 100097, China
2Beijing Research Center for Information Technology in Agriculture, Beijing 100097, China
3Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Chunjiang Zhao; nc.gro.aticren@jcoahz

Received 18 October 2016; Accepted 7 December 2016; Published 13 March 2017

Academic Editor: Maria Serrano

Copyright © 2017 Caiyun Lu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Improper postsowing compaction negatively affects soil temperature and thereby cold and frost tolerance, particularly in extreme cold weather. In North China Plain, the temperature falls to 5 degrees below zero, even lower in winter, which is period for winter wheat growing. Thus improving temperature to promote wheat growth is important in this area. A field experiment from 2013 to 2016 was conducted to evaluate effects of postsowing compaction on soil temperature and plant population of wheat at different stages during wintering period. The effect of three postsowing compaction methods—(1) compacting wheel (CW), (2) crosskill roller (CR), and (3) V-shaped compacting roller after crosskill roller (VCRCR)—on winter soil temperatures and relation to wheat shoot growth parameters were measured. Results showed that the highest soil midwinter temperature was in the CW treatment. In the 20 cm and 40 cm soil layer, soil temperatures were ranked in the following order of CW > VCRCR > CR. Shoot numbers under CW, CR, and VCRCR treatments were statistically 12.40% and 8.18% higher under CW treatment compared to CR or VCRCR treatments at the end of wintering period. The higher soil temperature under CW treatment resulted in higher shoot number at the end of wintering period, apparently due to reduced shoot death by cold and frost damage.