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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7479309, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7479309
Research Article

Evaluation of Selected Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Lines for Yield and Haulm Nutritive Quality Traits

1CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, P.O. Box TL 52, Tamale, Ghana
2CSIR-Animal Research Institute, P.O. Box TL 52, Nyankpala Station, Tamale, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Richard Oteng-Frimpong; moc.liamg@gnopmirfgnetok

Received 25 April 2017; Accepted 5 June 2017; Published 19 July 2017

Academic Editor: Mathias N. Andersen

Copyright © 2017 Richard Oteng-Frimpong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Groundnut, the most important grain legume in Ghana, is largely cultivated under rainfed conditions within the Guinea savanna zone of the country. The pods and haulms are important sources of income for smallholder farmers in the region. There is an emerging market for groundnut haulms as livestock feed in Ghana. A population of 30 groundnut genotypes were evaluated for yield (pod and haulm) and its components as well as good haulm nutritive value. High significant differences were observed among the genotypes for all agronomic traits. Average pod yield ranged from 1.6 to 5.7 t/ha with SAMNUT 23 and ICGV-IS 13081 being the most productive. Eight out of the 30 genotypes produced haulm yields above 8 t/ha. There was no significant difference among genotypes for in vitro gas production, digestible organic matter, ash, neutral detergent fibre, and metabolizable energy. However, crude protein, crude fibre, and acid detergent fibre were significantly different. Crude protein content was highest (12.53%) in GAF 1723 and lowest (8.00%) in ICGV-IS 08837. Genotypes GAF 1723, ICGV 00064, and ICGV-IS 13998 combined good pod/haulm yield with high haulm nutritive quality. Their utilization will improve farmers’ income and livelihoods in the Guinea savanna of Ghana.