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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2010, Article ID 864625, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/864625
Research Article

Ablation of the Locus Coeruleus Increases Oxidative Stress in Tg-2576 Transgenic but Not Wild-Type Mice

1Biologics Consulting Group, Inc., 400 N. Washington Street, Suite 100, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA
2Department of Medicine, Nursing, and Dentistry, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
3Metabolon Inc., 800 Capitola Drive, Suite 1, Durham, NC 27713-4385, USA
4Bayer Cropscience, 3500 Paramount Parkway Morrisville, NC 27560-7218, USA
5Pfizer, 558 Eastern Point Road Groton, CT 06340-5196, USA
6Proteostasis Therapeutics, 200 Technology Square, Suite 402, Boston, MA 02139, USA
7Department of Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
8Pfizer, Translational Medicine Research Collaboration, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK

Received 24 May 2010; Revised 23 August 2010; Accepted 3 September 2010

Academic Editor: Gemma Casadesus

Copyright © 2010 Orest Hurko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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