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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 490140, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/490140
Review Article

Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

1Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, 635 Charles Young Drive South, Suite 225, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, Department of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, 10911 Weyburn Avenue, Suite 200, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 2 September 2010; Revised 8 January 2011; Accepted 7 February 2011

Academic Editor: Lindsay A. Farrer

Copyright © 2011 Meredith N. Braskie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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