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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 542043, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/542043
Review Article

Alzheimer's Disease and Metals: A Review of the Involvement of Cellular Membrane Receptors in Metallosignalling

1Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia
2Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, and The Mental Health Research Institute, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 15 October 2010; Accepted 5 January 2011

Academic Editor: Paolo Zatta

Copyright © 2011 Pavithra C. Amadoruge and Kevin J. Barnham. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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