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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 607543, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/607543
Review Article

Lead, Manganese, and Methylmercury as Risk Factors for Neurobehavioral Impairment in Advanced Age

Department of Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 13 September 2010; Revised 28 October 2010; Accepted 24 November 2010

Academic Editor: Peter Faller

Copyright © 2011 Bernard Weiss. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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