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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 906964, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/906964
Review Article

Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

1Dipartimento di Biologia Cellulare e Neuroscienze, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
2Centro Nazionale Malattie Rare, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
3Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy

Received 2 November 2010; Revised 7 December 2010; Accepted 8 December 2010

Academic Editor: Katsuhiko Yanagisawa

Copyright © 2011 Fiorella Malchiodi-Albedi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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