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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 369808, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/369808
Review Article

Alzheimer's Disease and the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis: A Critical Review

1Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 28 November 2011; Accepted 3 January 2012

Academic Editor: Laura Morelli

Copyright © 2012 Christiane Reitz. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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