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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 489456, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/489456
Review Article

Microglial Scavenger Receptors and Their Roles in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease

Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA

Received 29 December 2011; Accepted 19 February 2012

Academic Editor: Lee-Way Jin

Copyright © 2012 Kim Wilkinson and Joseph El Khoury. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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