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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2013, Article ID 242303, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/242303
Clinical Study

KIF6 719Arg Carrier Status Association with Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Cleo Roberts Center for Clinical Research, Sun City, AZ 85351, USA

Received 27 June 2013; Revised 11 October 2013; Accepted 12 October 2013

Academic Editor: Francesco Panza

Copyright © 2013 Michael Malek-Ahmadi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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