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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2014, Article ID 431858, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/431858
Research Article

Identification and Preclinical Pharmacology of the -Secretase Modulator BMS-869780

1Exploratory Biology and Genomics, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
2Discovery Chemistry, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
3Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
4Preclinical Sciences, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc 352 Knotter Drive, Cheshire, CT 06410, USA
5Lead Discovery and Lead Profiling, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
6High Throughput Biology, Boehringer Ingelheim, 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877, USA
7Stratford High School, 45 North Parade, Stratford, CT 06615, USA
8External Research Solutions, WWMC, Pfizer World Wide Research & Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340, USA
9Arvinas Inc, 5 Science Park, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
10Discovery Analytical Sciences, Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
11Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, Pfizer World Wide Research & Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340, USA

Received 28 March 2014; Accepted 18 May 2014; Published 8 July 2014

Academic Editor: George Perry

Copyright © 2014 Jeremy H. Toyn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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