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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2014, Article ID 498629, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/498629
Research Article

Anticholinesterase and Antioxidative Properties of Aqueous Extract of Cola acuminata Seed In Vitro

1Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, PMB 704, Akure 340001, Nigeria
2Department of Biochemistry, Afe Babalola University, PMB 5454, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

Received 27 May 2014; Revised 16 October 2014; Accepted 30 October 2014; Published 18 November 2014

Academic Editor: Mark Kindy

Copyright © 2014 Ganiyu Oboh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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