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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2018, Article ID 2686045, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2686045
Research Article

Analysis of Association of Genetic Markers in the LUZP2 and FBXO40 Genes with the Normal Variability in Cognitive Performance in the Elderly

1Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk National Medical Research Center, Tomsk 634050, Russia
2Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050, Russia
3Nebbiolo Center for Clinical Trials, Tomsk 634009, Russia

Correspondence should be addressed to Vadim Stepanov; ur.scitenegdem@vonapets.midav

Received 3 October 2017; Accepted 15 March 2018; Published 19 April 2018

Academic Editor: Francesco Panza

Copyright © 2018 Vadim Stepanov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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