International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

Clinical Neurophysiology in Alzheimer’s Disease


Publishing date
15 May 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 Nov 2010

1Department of Neurology, University Campus Biomedico, Rome, Italy; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland

2Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland

3Department of Psychiatry and Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53719, USA

4Department of Health Sciences (3rd floor), University of L'Aquila, 67010 Coppito (AQ), Italy

5First Department of Neurology, Masaryk University, St. Anne's Hospital Pekarska 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic. AFaR; Department of Neuroscience, Hospital Fatebenefratelli, Rome, Italy


Clinical Neurophysiology in Alzheimer’s Disease

Description

The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying normal aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) have yet to be fully established. A major challenge of modern neuroscience is to identify the neuronal circuits which underlie specific cognitive functions; this objective is complicated as they undergo significant changes throughout the human lifespan and are profoundly affected by neurodegeneration in dementia. Successful early detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD demands the identification of biomarkers capable of distinguishing individuals with prodromal from healthy aging adults. It would also be critical to accurately identify MCI patients from individuals likely to convert to AD, in order to provide more effective treatments which may modify the course of the disorder. As altered functional connectivity may precede structural changes, it is important to implement techniques that are able to measure changes in normal aging brain and to discriminate them from neurodegenerative processes. Moreover, objective methods for the investigation of early functional changes would be useful in the diagnostics of MCI and AD.

This special issue seeks to outline the impact of state-of-the-art of affordable, noninvasive neurophysiological techniques for the measurement of physiological and pathological changes of the aging brain. The scope is to provide innovative information for the assessment of normal aging and dementia, both at a group- and single-subject level. We invite Authors to present original research articles as well as review articles that focus on cutting-edge methodologies aimed at identifying presymptomatic neurodegenerative disorders. We would also encourage manuscripts directed to underline the correlation between neurophysiological findings and neurodegeneration risk factors, including genetic causes, as well as articles providing a comprehensive review of electrophysiological data, which may offer a comprehensive overview of the effects of aging on brain function in space and time. The topics to be covered include, but are not limited to:

  • Low-density EEG and High-density EEG
  • Event-related potential (ERP)
  • Magnetoencephalography (MEG)
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)
  • Multimodal imaging and advanced analysis techniques
  • Neurophysiological techniques in evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to modulate AD pathology and cognitive impairment
  • Sleep neurophysiology and dementia

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijad/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 134157
  • - Editorial

Clinical Neurophysiology in Alzheimer's Disease

Florinda Ferreri | Sara Määttä | ... | Fabio Ferrarelli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 536141
  • - Case Report

An Unusual Cause of Dementia: Essential Diagnostic Elements of Corticobasal Degeneration—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

F. Mastrolilli | A. Benvenga | ... | F. Vernieri
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 263817
  • - Review Article

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Studies in Alzheimer's Disease

Andrea Guerra | Federica Assenza | ... | Florinda Ferreri
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 259069
  • - Research Article

Improving the Specificity of EEG for Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease

François-B. Vialatte | Justin Dauwels | ... | Andrzej Cichocki
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 481903
  • - Review Article

Brain Functional Network in Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnostic Markers for Diagnosis and Monitoring

Guido Rodriguez | Dario Arnaldi | Agnese Picco
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 654794
  • - Research Article

Combining Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroencephalography May Contribute to Assess the Severity of Alzheimer's Disease

Petro Julkunen | Anne M. Jauhiainen | ... | Hilkka Soininen
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 653173
  • - Review Article

The Use of Auditory Event-Related Potentials in Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

Fabrizio Vecchio | Sara Määttä
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 927573
  • - Review Article

Electroencephalographic Rhythms in Alzheimer’s Disease

Roberta Lizio | Fabrizio Vecchio | ... | Claudio Babiloni
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 761891
  • - Research Article

Does EEG Montage Influence Alzheimer's Disease Electroclinic Diagnosis?

L. R. Trambaiolli | A. C. Lorena | ... | R. Anghinah
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 539621
  • - Research Article

Slowing and Loss of Complexity in Alzheimer's EEG: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

Justin Dauwels | K. Srinivasan | ... | Andrzej Cichocki
International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
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