Table of Contents
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences
Volume 2013, Article ID 162541, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/162541
Research Article

Analysis of Convective Thunderstorm Split Cells in South-Eastern Romania

1Department of Atmospheric Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Bucharest, Romania
2National Meteorological Administration, Bucuresti-Ploiesti Avenue, No. 97, 013686 Bucharest, Romania

Received 29 August 2012; Revised 21 November 2012; Accepted 22 November 2012

Academic Editor: Helena A. Flocas

Copyright © 2013 Daniel Carbunaru et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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