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International Journal of Breast Cancer
Volume 2012, Article ID 574025, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/574025
Review Article

Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4390, USA
2Department of Oncology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20007, USA

Received 15 August 2011; Revised 4 November 2011; Accepted 11 November 2011

Academic Editor: Andra R. Frost

Copyright © 2012 Zahraa I. Khamis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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