International Journal of Breast Cancer

The Influence of the Cancer Microenvironment on the Process of Metastasis


Publishing date
15 Jan 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 Jul 2011

Lead Editor

1Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-1170, USA

2Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Avenue, Mobile, AL 36604, USA

3Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Avenue, Mobile, AL 36604, USA


The Influence of the Cancer Microenvironment on the Process of Metastasis

Description

Metastasis of breast cancer is a multistep process that requires cancer cells to invade stroma, gain access to vasculature, survive in the circulation, extravasate into the parenchyma of the secondary site, and survive and proliferate at the secondary site. During each of these steps, the microenvironment surrounding the cancer cells is an active participant. The cancer microenvironment varies during the metastatic process. At the primary tumor in the breast, invasive cancer cells are surrounded by fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, the vasculature, inflammatory/immune cells, and adipose tissue. Cancer cells are exposed to a different microenvironment within the circulatory system, including components of the blood and endothelial cells. The cancer microenvironment at the secondary site varies depending on the sites of metastasis. At each of these sites and during each of these processes, the microenvironment influences the behavior of the cancer cells and, in turn, the cancer cells alter the microenvironment, creating favorable conditions for advancing the metastatic process. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the myriad tumor-microenvironment interactions that impact breast cancer metastasis will enhance our knowledge of the biology of metastasis and could ultimately reveal new molecular or cellular targets for the prevention or treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

We invite authors to submit original research and review articles related to the role of the microenvironment in the metastatic process of breast cancer. The papers may be relevant to basic, translational, or clinical research, including targeting the tumor microenvironment in the management of metastatic disease. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Cancer-stroma interactions at the primary site (the breast) that regulate cancer migration and invasion. The stroma includes any cellular components and molecular components of the microenvironment (hypoxia, pH, cytokines, etc.) of the breast cancer
  • Cellular and molecular components of the blood and circulatory system that promote the metastatic process
  • Cancer-stroma interactions at any secondary site that regulate cancer cell migration and invasion, survival, dormancy and proliferation, and growth of established metastases
  • Cancer-stroma interactions as biomarkers for the prediction of metastasis or as targets for the treatment or prevention of metastases

Articles published in this special issue will not be subject to the journal's Article Processing Charges.

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijbc/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 756257
  • - Editorial

The Influence of the Cancer Microenvironment on the Process of Metastasis

Andra R. Frost | Douglas R. Hurst | ... | Rajeev S. Samant
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 574025
  • - Review Article

Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

Zahraa I. Khamis | Ziad J. Sahab | Qing-Xiang Amy Sang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 124704
  • - Review Article

RKIP Suppresses Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Bone by Regulating Stroma-Associated Genes

Elena Bevilacqua | Casey A. Frankenberger | Marsha Rich Rosner
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 721659
  • - Review Article

The Microenvironmental Effect in the Progression, Metastasis, and Dormancy of Breast Cancer: A Model System within Bone Marrow

Bobby Y. Reddy | Philip K. Lim | ... | Pranela Rameshwar
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 160265
  • - Research Article

Changes in Cytokines of the Bone Microenvironment during Breast Cancer Metastasis

Donna M. Sosnoski | Venkatesh Krishnan | ... | Andrea M. Mastro
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 654698
  • - Review Article

Role of Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer Metastasis

Sudipa Saha Roy | Ratna K. Vadlamudi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 516417
  • - Review Article

Current Operative Management of Breast Cancer: An Age of Smaller Resections and Bigger Cures

Jack W. Rostas | Donna Lynn Dyess
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 298623
  • - Review Article

The Hedgehog Pathway Conditions the Bone Microenvironment for Osteolytic Metastasis of Breast Cancer

Shamik Das | Rajeev S. Samant | Lalita A. Shevde
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 716564
  • - Review Article

Expression of Toll-Like Receptors on Breast Tumors: Taking a Toll on Tumor Microenvironment

Debika Bhattacharya | Nabiha Yusuf
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 209748
  • - Review Article

The Role of Cancer Stem Cells in the Organ Tropism of Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Mechanistic Balance between the “Seed” and the “Soil”?

Jenny E. Chu | Alison L. Allan
International Journal of Breast Cancer
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Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision45 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
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