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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2013, Article ID 298968, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/298968
Research Article

Efficient Evaluation of Biodiversity Concerns in Protected Areas

1Savanna and Arid Research Unit, Conservation Services, South African National Parks, Private Bag X402, Skukuza 1350, South Africa
2School of Biological & Conservation Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P/Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
3Savanna and Arid Research Unit, Conservation Services, South African National Parks, P.O. Box 110040, Hadison Park, Kimberley, 8306, South Africa
4Applied Behavioural Ecology and Ecosystem Research Unit, UNISA, Private Bag X6, Florida 1717, South Africa

Received 4 March 2013; Revised 28 June 2013; Accepted 17 July 2013

Academic Editor: Pere Pons

Copyright © 2013 Sam Ferreira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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