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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2013, Article ID 946361, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/946361
Research Article

Spatial Distribution of Zooplankton Diversity across Temporary Pools in a Semiarid Intermittent River

Grupo Ecologia de Rios do Semiárido, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba-UEPB, Rua Horácio Trajano de Oliveira, S/N, Cristo Redentor, 58020-540 João Pessoa, PB, Brazil

Received 14 January 2013; Revised 17 May 2013; Accepted 19 May 2013

Academic Editor: José Manuel Guerra-García

Copyright © 2013 Thaís X. Melo and Elvio S. F. Medeiros. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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