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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 643031, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/643031
Research Article

Woody Species Diversity in Traditional Agroforestry Practices of Dellomenna District, Southeastern Ethiopia: Implication for Maintaining Native Woody Species

1Department of Natural Resource Management, Debre Markos University, 251 269 Debre Markos, Ethiopia
2Department of Forestry, Madda Walabu University, 251 247 Bale Robe, Ethiopia

Received 23 September 2015; Revised 2 November 2015; Accepted 3 November 2015

Academic Editor: Alexandre Sebbenn

Copyright © 2015 Abiot Molla and Gonfa Kewessa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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