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International Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume 2008, Article ID 372125, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/372125
Research Article

Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex: A Possible Target for Modulating Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

First Department of Neurology, Masaryk University, Saint Anne's Hospital, Pekařská 53, Brno 65691, Czech Republic

Received 30 April 2007; Accepted 2 October 2007

Academic Editor: Antonio P. Strafella

Copyright © 2008 I. Rektorova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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