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International Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume 2010, Article ID 471408, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/471408
Research Article

Timing of Imaging after D-Luciferin Injection Affects the Longitudinal Assessment of Tumor Growth Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

1Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan
2Division of Molecular Therapy, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan
3Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 21 March 2010; Accepted 30 May 2010

Academic Editor: Vasilis Ntziachristos

Copyright © 2010 Yusuke Inoue et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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