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International Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume 2013, Article ID 803579, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/803579
Review Article

Hydraphiles: A Rigorously Studied Class of Synthetic Channel Compounds with In Vivo Activity

1Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Biology, Center for Nanoscience, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121, USA
2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 236 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
3Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA

Received 31 August 2012; Accepted 26 November 2012

Academic Editor: Anne Clough

Copyright © 2013 Saeedeh Negin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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