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International Journal of Corrosion
Volume 2016, Article ID 3121247, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3121247
Research Article

Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steels in CCTS Environment

Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo, Viale Marconi 5, Dalmine, 24044 Bergamo, Italy

Received 17 November 2015; Accepted 11 January 2016

Academic Editor: Ksenija Babic

Copyright © 2016 M. Cabrini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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