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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 470597, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/470597
Review Article

When Cells Suffocate: Autophagy in Cancer and Immune Cells under Low Oxygen

1Deeley Research Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 2410 Lee Avenue, Victoria, BC, Canada V8R 6V5
2Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, Petch Bldg Ring Road, Victoria, BC, Canada V8P 5C2

Received 28 July 2011; Accepted 14 August 2011

Academic Editor: R. Seger

Copyright © 2011 Katrin Schlie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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