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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 139573, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/139573
Review Article

Brain Miffed by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor

1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2Clinic I for Internal Medicine, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straße 62, 50924 Cologne, Germany

Received 18 May 2012; Revised 6 July 2012; Accepted 12 July 2012

Academic Editor: Pier Giorgio Mastroberardino

Copyright © 2012 Nic E. Savaskan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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