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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 189521, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/189521
Review Article

Plakoglobin: Role in Tumorigenesis and Metastasis

Department of Cell Biology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2H7

Received 17 October 2011; Accepted 8 November 2011

Academic Editor: Eok-Soo Oh

Copyright © 2012 Zackie Aktary and Manijeh Pasdar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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