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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 486147, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/486147
Review Article

The Yin and Yang of Nrf2-Regulated Selenoproteins in Carcinogenesis

Department Biochemistry of Micronutrients, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany

Received 1 February 2012; Accepted 20 February 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Filomeni

Copyright © 2012 Regina Brigelius-Flohé et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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