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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 501962, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/501962
Review Article

Macrophage Migration and Its Regulation by CSF-1

School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, M510, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

Received 6 September 2011; Revised 4 November 2011; Accepted 4 November 2011

Academic Editor: Wiljan J. A. J. Hendriks

Copyright © 2012 Fiona J. Pixley. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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