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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 512721, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/512721
Review Article

Pexophagy: The Selective Degradation of Peroxisomes

Section of Molecular Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0322, USA

Received 16 October 2011; Accepted 23 November 2011

Academic Editor: Masaaki Komatsu

Copyright © 2012 Andreas Till et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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