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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 908724, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/908724
Review Article

Altered Gene Expression, Mitochondrial Damage and Oxidative Stress: Converging Routes in Motor Neuron Degeneration

1Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome, Italy
2Institute for Cell Biology and Neurobiology, CNR, 00100 Rome, Italy
3IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, 00143 Rome, Italy

Received 13 February 2012; Accepted 15 March 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Filomeni

Copyright © 2012 Luisa Rossi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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