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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 638083, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/638083
Review Article

Role of Protein Misfolding and Proteostasis Deficiency in Protein Misfolding Diseases and Aging

1Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Brain Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 72160 Puebla, Mexico

Received 11 July 2013; Revised 8 October 2013; Accepted 9 October 2013

Academic Editor: Roberto Chiesa

Copyright © 2013 Karina Cuanalo-Contreras et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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